Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Look Out, Look Out.

For Chemistry, I have an assignment that involves researching about a type of element (boiling/melting point, texture, uses, color, odor, family, group, interesting facts, etc) and because I had heard in biology that Arsenic was the Silent Killer, I called it and started looking facts on it, finding out that its only real use is poison. It's found on foods occasionally (mostly organic arsenic, inorganic is found in sodas), but from what I can gather, there's no actual health benefits. In fact, we just go for the arsenic that is the least deadly, not for what kind is healthy (as there is no such a thing, although I'm hoping I'm right on this.)

So on my reading of this Silent Killer (which may not be so silent, as my teacher had said it was odorless and colorless, both things which prove to be slightly false. I guess it's just silent when it infects things like water? o.e'), I was reminded of something my father told me.

Ever since I started reading the encyclopedia of serial killers, I was speaking to him about how when I was much younger, due to movies and many fictional works, I always assumed to gain status as a "serial killer", you needed to have fifty to a hundred murders. Thirty being the least. Although there has been the notorious and dangerous criminal who went over a good 100 body count, (Ted Bundy was a famous one, but he got a record of 30 to 35 murders), if you check out wiki's page on the list of serial killers and you'll see the number of names grow as the number of murders decline. In fact, really notorious serial killers like Jack the Ripper, the Zodiac Killer, and even Ted Bundy, don't have hundred or two hundred murders. Of course, that's due to a number of factors, primarily being that neither JtR or the Zodiac Killer were identified, and Ted Bundy received a shit load of coverage from the press, so they became well known despite their low body count (oh god, I don't mean that as a bad thing! It's so difficult to talk about serial killers without coming off as creepy o.e')

Anyways, so I was trying to decide why this happened and why the body count of "famous" serial killers was at times so low. In just looking at the wiki page, notice that the first 21 listed serial killers with the highest body count did not operate in America.

So...what are the chances of getting caught in the United States after one commits a murder?

When I was talking to my father, we were trying to figure out what could be the relationship between the number of murders you commit. and the probability of getting caught after each murder. Basically, if you kill someone, how much does your chance freedom drop? Fifty? Thirty? One of those?

Because something like that could really just depend on the type of place you live in, the consequences surrounding it, who the victim was, the type of murder done, and even what type of person the murderer is, etc, my father figured that, despite it being a large number, at least fifty percent of your chance of freedom could drop. So the question could be, how much body count can you accumulate before the chance of freedom is near non-existent? He thought of a relatively simple way of slightly figuring it out.

He told me, "Every time you're in an elevator with someone, imagine that the murder takes place there. Once you get out, check to see how many people see you come out, and remember how many saw you come in. Count them."

It's simple really, but I think it could work as a basic, basic, basic way of calculating it. Of course there could be other ways, but I've decided to try this one. Which will be difficult seeing as how I do all I can to avoid taking elevators with other people (maybe for this same reason o.e). It could explain why people at the U.S were caught after a few murders.

On the topic of serial killers, this might sound random, but Pedro López's story pisses me off beyond belief. Not just because of what he did, but because of what happened once in his near capture and death. He was almost caught once by a tribe after he tried to attack one of the children. The encyclopedia says this:
On release from prison, López started stalking young girls with a vengeance; by 1978 the killer estimated he had raped and slain at least 100 in Peru. His specialty appeared to be abducting children from Indian tribes,but the technique backfired when he was captured by agroup of Ayachucos in northern Peru while attempting to kidnap a nine-year-old girl. López was beaten by hiscaptors, stripped, and tortured. The Ayachucos were about to bury him alive when a female American missionary intervened, convincing Pedro’s captors that they should deliver him to the police. They grudgingly agreed and López was deported within days, Peruvian authorities declining to waste valuable time on Indian complaints. 
-The Encyclopedia of Serial Killers, Michael Newton.
This is just what happens when people assume the world is the same all around. Sure you traveled and had the money to go there, lady. Alright, as a missionary I'm sure she had good motives, almost as nice as the pictures she probably took that surely will look incredibly pretty next to her fancy nightstand in her comfortable home back in the U.S. But not everything in the world has the fancy police, and the just system, and the same ideals of this nation. Now...that doesn't mean I completely agree with what the tribe was doing to him...but...what would I have done? What is the right answer to that? In the long run, the woman didn't know the consequences of interfering. She didn't know he would continue to murder and kill little girls, and it wasn't her fault. I don't know who the woman was and so should not attack her. But the fact is that he was imprisoned and released many times. He wasn't a master mind, he was just both incredibly lucky and born in the right country. Now they don't even know where he is.

And frankly, talking about him more is freaking me out.

It's funny how I can sit and read about these murderers all night, flinching and wincing at the description of the methods done, and yet I find it terrifyingly confusing how people can say they have a "favorite" serial killer (which I've heard a few times, in forums and the like). Are they just trying to do what so many have before and attempt to pretend to stand out and "be an original" to the masses without realizing the context of their own words? o.o Or are they actually serious?
(If you're wondering, going around saying what your favorite non-fictional, fully realistic serial killer is, won't make you look interesting or cool-weird. It'll just be fucking creepy. Kay?).

I may write about serial killers (or well...one of them. Being Rosegrave and Whiskey the prime ones) but I know that there's a blatant line between idolizing a terrible human being and exploring their thoughts and ideas. That's why I would probably never publish such work. Not because I'd be afraid of the controversy, but because I don't think I'll ever be able to do what some writers can. To be able to explore a heavy theme in a way that would both detach and attach my ideas from the story so that I don't cover it up completely with my thoughts and simply explore an idea. I don't think I'm even slightly ready for that.

Anyways, enough talk about serial killers. I spend enough of my time reading up on these demented individuals ._.

So I have no clue why I was doing it, but I was listening to the Bridal Chorus (Here Comes The Bride) song and couldn't stop thinking...why is it such a crappy song? Okay, it must have been so great at its beginning that now it's everywhere and anywhere and the first thing that pops into one's mind when we say "wedding, bride walking down the aisle." But it is so terrible. There are better classical songs, why use just Wagner's? Tradition is a crappy answer to that. Dx

Personally, I wouldn't mind playing this:

Mass Effect  - Vigil (in case the thingy up there isn't working, that's the name :3)

Plus, I had economics class today. Who knew my professor could begin the greatest retelling of the beginning of the recession with the words, "It was 1998, and young Charles was just getting out of school."

No wonder my classmates are convinced he's the one professor we have that's got "swag" o.o
~Becky

P.S: Changed the site name and little banner :D No clue why o.o' It just relates to Dream's story much better now.

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

Awkwardness FTW

So no less than a few minutes ago, I'm sitting here, studying for evil!AP American history, and working on Slendy blog when I get a call from Pai Mei. This doesn't usually happen, especially in the middle of the week, so I found it odd and answered the phone. Turns out he was walking to some...dorm...thing...place, with his friend. Who's planning the road trip with him. Who has briefly heard about me. Who got shoved the phone into his hand to say hi to me--the girl whom he's never met who lives all the way in Florida. Who had to hold a conversation with me because Pai Mei wouldn't take the phone back.


Alright, alright, I'm not being mean. Alex was actually very nice, and even though the phone had crap reception, the wind kept going SWOOSHSWOOSHSWOOSH, they had me on shitty loud speaker so they sounded like they were ten thousand miles away while arguing about whether or not the RV should be called "Awesome", and I had the most strange difficulty of trying to distinguish who was saying what (do 19 year old boys just sound the same at that point in time? When does the creepy deep voice come in for them?), it still sounded like the two of them had a good friendship. Plus their discussion about the RV and what briefly has been done for the trip (which I barely heard; SWOOSHSWOOSH remember?) at least makes it sound like they have their brains intact for this.

I'm like Sherlock Holmes, man. Deduced so much in less than five minutes of conversation -shot-. I still wish I hadn't sounded like such an idiot, though o_o' His first impression of me was probably along the lines of, "Who's this twelve year old little kid you called? Are you sure you didn't get the wrong number, man?"

._.' story of my life.

Anyways, so, I've been writing most of Hardship in school while lamenting about the evil work I have to get done. In every break, I go through about two minutes of self pity before writing as fast as possible every idea and scene that comes to mind--which at times means skipping sections of description I don't feel like doing at the moment. Woo~

Not sure when I'll be starting that Basic Eight script...maybe when I'm not hyperventilating about the periodic table and lead up to the American Revolution.

...man, I gotta watch John Adams again.
~Becky

P.S: I just realized in Urban Dictionary, the example for Awkward Turtle has my name on it. It's like we're meant to be O_o

Monday, September 12, 2011

Script writing? Dragon, Dragon~


Doing economics homework, so I shall make this quick.

I don't think I've ever mentioned this, but aside from Lolita and A Clockwork Orange, it seems that my down right favorite book in my entire fifteen years of life has to be The Basic Eight, by Daniel Handler. And boy is it awkward, not in the sense that it's awkwardly worded and bad, but in the sense I find it both brilliant and a bit of an uncomfortable read at times (which nevertheless, I love, love, love). It's the one book I haven't necessarily let my brother read no matter how much he questions my strong attachment to it, and to the few who have read (seriously, I hardly hear of people knowing about it. Isn't that odd?) I'm sure you know why.

So I found a trailer for an apparent amateur movie made more than two years ago, found here, and got quite interested in that. The group seems to have worked very hard on the production of it, and even if there was a novice feel to it, I kept thinking and thinking about it. My experience in writing scripts is limited. I wrote a semi-tv show script for First Impressions, a couple scenes for the murder/adventure story with Whiskey and Rosegrave, and the first couple of pages of a pirate story I had working--video game style. For some reason, coming up with a plot for a movie or script just drains me completely. I can get mental images and scenes right, but the actual plot? My head just goes completely blank.

So maybe as a project of sorts, I'll try to write script for The Basic Eight in a purely fan made way (I'm not planning it to be good enough to be a movie, but still stick to the whole "taking out bits due to time constrain" to get the real feeling of it), and maybe post it along the way if it turns out good. I'm shooting for nothing more than two hours, but definitely not just 90 minutes. Maybe two hours and twenty minutes? Somewhere there?

I have to read scripts for that, and no, I won't be giving up on the 100 themes. Slowly but surely, I'm working on part 2, Hardship. I am going to finish this. After all, this isn't just for me. It's for Carp/Lyra, Spirit, and Dream, and I owe them three (or...well...one if you're counting real people xD) quite a lot already.

On last notes, Slendy blog is doing good so far. Nothing crazy at first, then the madness shall grow. Also, saw the September 11 memorial on Sunday. We sat through the reading of the names until they ended the transmission and my mother even cried. Then there was that moment, near nighttime, when Pai Mei told me he was celebrating his youngest brother's birthday, who was turning ten that day.
Needless to say, it took me a full five minutes to make the connection. Ain't I smart?

~Becky

P.S: Heh, in looking for The Basic Eight cover picture, I found this. That's quite interesting xD. Although I never quite pictured Flan as Jodelle Ferland, even though it could work. Selena Gomez as the glamorous Natasha Hyatt, though? No way! I'm not denying the actress isn't beautiful but...I don't know. Natasha doesn't seem like a Selenz Gomez to me. I'm trying to think of someone who could be as glamorous and femme fatale-ish as Natasha, so maybe if I come up with someone good while writing the script (or even after), I'll fiddle around and post a cast last. Woo~

Friday, September 9, 2011

ChemistryPreCalculusAPAmericanEconomicsOhMyGawdI'mDying

So first off, today be a birthday of an epic man. So I shall say Happy Birthday, Epic Man (even though you don't read my blog) :D

Next part: I will die. So. Many. Things. To do DX. I thought last year was busy, this year shall surely kill me. I've been neglecting everything. RP's, Pai Mei (nineteen-year-old-dude--and then again, he must neglect me o.e'), 100 themes challenge, epic!Carp, and all other kinds of fanceh ness. I gotta learn the periodic table by Thursday as well as a bunch of other things. So...erm...verrryyyy busyyy DX. We'll see how I survive.

Oh! But I'm starting a Slenderman blog with Emzy. I just finished designing it, and I'm not gonna link it because about...two people read this blog? o.e' yeahhhh, and either way, I want to see if it surfaces on its own or just stays there forgotten XD. Let's hope I actually update on it rather than forget about it and leave it to dust D:

Anyways, yeah, just a quick update. I'm gonna go eat some left over chips and cookies and maybe drink some soda on a fancy glass before passing out.

Also...this might be a stupid thing I thought about in Study Hall this morning because of the INJUSTICE, but if you punish a bunch of people just because a few did something stupid, wouldn't that technically inspire a revolt? And later some anarchy?

...erm...been reading too much V for Vendetta...

I gotta name my kid Anarki now >_____>'
~Becky
"Science and science fiction have done a kind of dance over the last century... The scientists make a finding. It inspires science fiction writers to write about it, and a host of young people read the science fiction and are excited, and inspired to become scientists...which they do, which then feeds again into another generation of science fiction and science..."
- Carl Sagan, in his message to future explorers of Mars.